Connect with us

The Best Tourist Attractions In Europe

Published

on

Advertisement

Europe may seem far away for some, but it contains some of the world’s best culture and interesting history in the world. There are plenty of countries to visit each with their own unique foods, sites, and lifestyles. We’ve outlined some of the best sites to visit if you ever find yourself in that part of the world.

The Eiffel Tower – Paris, France

Advertisement
Advertisement

One of the most recognizable towers in the world, the Eiffel Tower stands proudly at 324 meters. It is located on the Champ de Mars and named after its engineer. The Eiffel Tower was erected in 1889 and originally panned for its design. Today, it is one of the most iconic buildings in the world.

The Louvre – Paris, France

Advertisement

You won’t need to travel far to visit another European attraction – The Louvre Museum. It’s one of the largest museums and historical monuments in the world. There are nearly 35,000 individual items and objects that date all the way back to the prehistoric times! It has more than 9.7 million visitors a year.

Colosseum – Rome, Italy

Advertisement

The Colosseum sits in the center of Rome and is widely considered to be one of the greatest human achievements of engineering and architecture. It remains the largest amphitheater in the world and can be dated all the way back to 72 AD. Today, people travel all the way from Europe and America to witness the work of Romans from thousands of years ago.

Sistine Chapel – Vatican City

Advertisement

The Sistine Chapel is the official home of the Pope. It takes its name from Pope Sixtus IV who renovated it in the 15th century. The Chapel is located within Vatican City, which itself is only 0.44 square kilometers in size. Today, many consider the Chapel to be the religious and cultural home of the Catholic Church.

Big Ben – London, England

Advertisement

Big Ben is the name of the bell that rings inside the Palace of Westminster. The official name of the tower is Elizabeth Tower, although many refer to it as its nickname. It was completed in 1858 and is the second-largest four-faced chiming clock in the world and was momentarily stopped for renovation in 2018.

Parthenon – Acropolis, Athens, Greece

Advertisement

This former temple was built in 438 BC making it one of the oldest building still in existence today. It is located on the top of a large hill and considered the most important surviving structure of Ancient Greece and Western Civilization. Today, travelers can visit the structure and get as close as possible to society from thousands of years ago.

Leaning Tower of Pisa – Pisa, Italy

Advertisement

The Leaning Tower of Pisa is known across the world for its unintentional tilt to one side. Visitors used to be able to enter the building but it was quickly closed considering the risks involved. You’ve probably seen photos on social media of people posing pretending to hold it in place. It stands at 55.9 meters at its low side and 56.7 meters at its high point!

Stonehenge – Wiltshire, England

Advertisement

Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument which is still one of the world’s largest mysteries. It is compiled by a group of standing stones 13 feet high and each weighing 25 tons. To this day, archeologists are unsure how they were built in 2500 BC. Stonehenge is technically owned by The Crown and is protected by the English Heritage.

Berlin Wall – Berlin, Germany

Advertisement

Visiting the Berlin Wall will remind travelers of some of Europe’s more controversial history. The wall stood tall between 1961 and 1989 and acted as a physical and ideological barrier dividing the city. Its fall is often acknowledged as one of the most significant moments in the late 20th century. There are still parts that are up and open to visitors.

Sagrada Família – Barcelona, Spain

Advertisement

This large Roman church remains incomplete but has nonetheless been protected by the UNESCO World Heritage Site. Construction started in 1882 and was paused after the death of its primary architects, Antoni Gaudi. The site divides local citizens between those who want it finally finished and those who think its current state is, itself, art.


Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement